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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
% or more out at this hour. and as we saw with irene then again with the october snowstorm, it can take a long time, perhaps a week or even nine or ten days before the power gets restored for a lot of folks. >> jeff stecker from wvit. thank you for that update. to the point he was making that it's so dark outside, there's so much water out there, there are so many downed lines. take this advice. this came from the fairfield police chief. "we have limited responsibilities, please stay inside your house and we are expecting massive damage." and i think that that would apply to communities up and down the eastern seaboard. we will continue msnbc's live coverage of hurricane sandy right after this. [ ryan ] it doesn't get any better than endless shrimp at red lobster. you can mix and match all day! [ male announcer ] don't miss red lobster's endless shrimp, just $14.99! try as much as you like, any way you like! like parmesan crusted shrimp. hurry in, offer ends soon! i'm ryan isabell and i see food differently. hurry in, offer ends soon! wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo
during hurricane irene, so they knew what to do. they knew exactly when to leave. they got there immediately once they were advised to leave. so we're really proud of these folks in the shelter and, you know, they just seem to be having a good time. they are in a safe place. they've got warm meals and they've got the support of the american red cross to get them through these hard times, because when they go home, they don't know what they're going to expect. they could go home to severe flooding and severe damage to their homes so having that safety net right now is so important. >> well, besides the shelters which obviously are critically important and could continue to be so because as you say of flooding and we're hearing that some of these power outages could be long term, what are the priorities of the services that the red cross will provide in the next couple of days? >> yes, we've already gone ahead and told them and pre-positioned over 100 emergency response vehicles and thousands of relief supplies, cots, blanket, food and deployed odd thousand of volunteers so o
this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene. much worse than other states. six weeks later, we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 customers without power in our state. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some towns had 97% people without power each and every time in the last year. we're getting used to this right now. we're actually becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme weather, we have seen governor cuomo talking about that as the new normal. climate change is such a politicized things, but if we're seeing frequent instances of things that are not supposed to happen but once in a century, what do you have to do differently in terms of infrastructure you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these events? >> number one, i have been talking about climate change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure. literally lift it up off the ground. and we have to think of our cities very d
've been through this. we got banged up very badly a year ago with irene much worse than other states. six weeks later we had a winter storm that wiped us out. we had 1.1 million people in our little -- our customers in our little state without power. tonight we have over 600,000 people without power. some of our towns were affected by all three of those events and some of those towns are 97% of people without power. we're getting used to it and becoming experts at it. >> in terms of the frequency of extreme we've seen governor cuomo talking about it as planning on it to be the new normal. climate change is so politicized but if we are seeing frequent things of things that aren't supposed to happen what are you to do differently that you wouldn't have to do if you weren't facing these frequent and continuing events. >> i've been talking about climbed change since 1997. it's happened. it's alive and well in connecticut. number two, we have to raise a lot of infrastructure, that is literally lift it up off the ground and we have to think of our cities very differently than we thought about t
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)